7 profitable life coaching niches that make a difference

Want to build a successful life coaching business? Here are 7 tried & tested coaching niches that will help you make a difference and make a living.

25-minute read

Since The Good Alliance was founded we’ve had the pleasure of working with a huge variety of life coaches. Our team are always surprised by just how unique, creative and different our client’s businesses are from each other.

Although many of our clients would call themselves a ‘life coach’ we’ve found that no two are alike. Over the years we’ve helped life coaches from all walks of life create their brand and grow their business.

Profit + Purpose = Success

To make a difference and make a living you need to choose a profitable niche that you believe in. If you have a vision of the change you want to create then you will find purpose in your work and, when it comes to running a successful business, finding purpose in your work is essential.

So don’t just choose a niche because it is profitable, really consider what you care about and how you can make an impact. When people believe in you and your vision they will want to work with you and clients will seek you out.

This list has been put together through our own experience working with life coaches and watching their businesses grow. We’ve focused on the ones which we have seen become profitable whilst making an impact time and time again. If you know of a profitable coaching niche that we haven’t included let us know in the comments below.

What is a life coach?

We like to think of life coaching as an umbrella term for some amazing coaching niches. The 7 coaching niches we mention below all fall under the life coach umbrella and they all require similar skillsets.

All life coaches help their clients to be happier, more well-rounded and healthy. Whether their clients are looking to build their confidence, improve their relationships or achieve a life-goal – a life coach can help make it happen.

We could wax on about how great we think life coaches are (if you’re into that sort of thing then check out our blog for more) but let’s get right to it: here’s our list of 7 profitable life coaching niches that make a difference.

1. Mindset and accountability coach

We kick off our list with our mindset and accountability niche. When Joe Public hears the words ‘life coach’ they often picture someone who can help take them to the next level. Someone who can break down their barriers and give them the courage, motivation and inspiration to achieve their dreams.

This kind of coaching is very results-focused and regular client check-ins are a must. This means more sessions booked for you, more accountability for your client, and more chance of them achieving their goals.

When thinking about mindset coaching it’s best to try and niche down even further. You could try to help everyone achieve their goals but you’ll find more success if you have a strong vision of the difference you want to make and who you want to help. Think about who you want to help (their age, gender, their unique needs) and why you want to help them (what do you get out of it and what will keep you going when things get tough?)

Some examples of mindset coaches are:

Brooke Castillo

The Life Coach School
thelifecoachschool.com

Craig White

High performance coach for men
craigwhitecoaching.com

Trish Blackwell

Confidence and accountability coach
trishblackwell.com

2. Health and fitness coach

Health, fitness and wellness coaches are another strong contender for “who do you think of when you think of life coaches?” and for good reason. For many people, their health is incredibly important to them – not just their mental health but their physical health too – but it can be a challenge.

Health coaches can improve lives in a whole number of ways, from helping to transform their physique to managing stress and anxiety. It’s a profitable coaching niche because people often embark on a health journey, making small improvements and learning more over a period of time. Your client may start out knowing nothing about diet and fitness but over time achieve their ideal weight and nutritional goals. Improving your client’s health will take time but you’ll be there to support them along the way.

Making a lifestyle change doesn’t come easy so your clients will need guidance and help to stay motivated.

Here are some ways to niche down further and help people as a health coach:

  • Help them achieve their fitness and exercise goals.
  • Help them follow a balanced diet and improve their nutrition.
  • Help them to change their diet or lifestyle, e.g. if they want to follow a plant-based diet or follow a vegan lifestyle.
  • Help them navigate a specific health issue.
  • Help them improve their health through excercise.

Some examples of health coaches are:

    Margaret Wehrenberg

    Anxiety coach for professionals
    margaretwehrenberg.com

    Mel Noakes

    The self-care coach
    melnoakes.com / view case study

    Annie Rosenthal

    Eating psychology coach
    annierosenthal.net

    3. Small business coach

    Perhaps our first controversion addition to this list of profitable life coach niches, you might be wondering how a business coach could be considered a life coach?

    While some businesses coaches probably don’t consider themselves a life coach we’ve worked with many coaches who do. The difference we’ve found is that it has to do with size.
    Where many business coaches work with large organisations to help improve productivity, create a culture or tighten up the processes, small businesses coaches are faced with some very different challenges.

    There are thousands of small businesses out there that are run by individuals who are trying their best to go it alone (you might even be one of them). When it comes to serving businesses at this size you may find that your clients business and personal life are one and the same. Cash flow problems and the day to day running of their businesses can negatively impact their health. Meanwhile any problems they have in their personal life may cause them to not be as focused on their business. As a one-person business, any personal issues or shortfalls could directly be affecting their business.

    For small business coaches, part of the challenge is figuring out where the issues are and then creating a programme to work through them. Sure, they might help improve the technical aspects of the business, but they also have to make sure that the person running it isn’t burning themselves out too.

    Some examples of small business coaches are:

      Matthew Kimberley

      The Entrepreneur’s Secret Weapon
      matthewkimberley.com

      Katrina Widener

      Entrepreneur coach
      katrinawidener.com

      Melissa Dawn

      CEO of your life
      ceoofyour.life

      4. Relationship coach

      When it comes to life coaching niches we think that relationship coaches can be overlooked. Relationship coaches are heroes who help people when they are often at their most fragile. Although they may not have many long-term clients’s the work that they do might be considered far more intense.

      Offering support in a safe and welcoming space these heroes make a huge impact on their clients as they work on improving or repairing their relationships.

      On TV we see relationship coaches helping couples going through a tough time or navigating divorce, but they can also do much more. They can help people deal with the loss of a loved one, come to terms with their sexuality, or improve their marriage or sex lives.

      Some examples of relationship coaches are:

        Laura Doyle

        Relationship coach
        lauradoyle.org

        Corinne Blum

        Connecting with your true self
        corinneblum.com

        Elizabeth Sullivan

        Dating coach for women
        lovementor.com

        5. Career coach

        How do you stand out, ask for a pay rise or find your dream job? With a large part of our lives taken up by our work it’s no surprise that career coaching can be a highly profitable coaching niche. Feeling valued at work and being fairly compensated can be life-changing, both financially and in terms of your own feeling of self-worth.

        Career coaches are experts at building up their clients confidence and helping them carve out their career path. Their advice can be invaluable, helping their clients to figure out when to ask for a raise or when to look elsewhere.

        More than just helping them climb the ladder, it’s often about helping clients who have become stuck in their jobs and feel trapped by their lifestyle. Career coaches must first get to know their clients to better understand their motivations, what makes them get out of bed each day and what excites them.

        The proof for these coaches can often be seen in the glowing testimonials they receive – it seems that landing your dream job or getting a big pay rise makes clients pretty happy. When you have clients who are singing your praises it’s not too farfetched to think that there will be more clients to come.

        Some examples of career coaches are:

          Wies Bratby

          Negotiation coach for high-achieving women
          womeninnegotiation.org

          Julia Carter

          Coaching for busy professional women
          zestforbalance.com

          Hannah Beko

          Coaching for the career superhero
          authenticallyspeaking.co.uk

          6. Parenting and family coach

          For many people, parenthood can feel like uncharted territory. What should be a thrilling and joyful time in their lives can feel overwhelming and scary without the right support.

          Parenting and family coaches can provide advice at all stages of family life. Whether someone wants to start a family, or they have children already, an experienced coach can make all the difference when there is uncertainty.

          Coaches in this niche might draw on their own experiences and combine them with tried-and-tested coaching practises to create a programme for their clients.

          Leaning more into the family aspect, coaches could find their niche in helping families who have moved overseas, help adults to reconnect with parents/siblings, or help those who have recently become stay-at-home parents.

          Some examples of family coaches are:

            Andrew Loosley

            The natural fertility expert
            naturalfertilityexpert.com

            Jess Rowe

            Coaching for parents of challenging children
            jessrowe.com.au

            Katia Vlachos

            The overseas transition coach
            katiavlachos.com

            7. Executive coach

            Aiming to change work culture and lives from the top-down, executive coaches work with upper-management to transform organisations. They work with leaders to improve the performance of the business and make it a more harmonious place for employees.

            This top-down approach to change means that executive coaches can create huge ripples with their work – small change at the top could have huge implications for the entire organisation. While some life coaches prefer a more intimate setting, executive coaches need to be able to deal with the pressure that company executives face and utilise their coaching tools effectively.

            Some examples of executive coaches are:

              Dominique Ara

              Transformational leadership coach
              dominique-ara.com

              Marika Messager

              Elevating business through humanity.
              consciousleadership.org

              Shereen Hoban

              Executive mindfulness coaching
              shereenhobancoaching.com

              Over to you…

              We love hearing about coaches who are making a difference in their niche. So, if you have an interesting niche be sure to share it with us in the comments below.

              Are you making a difference whilst making a living? If so, we’d love to hear from you and feature you on our recurring blog segment called change makers. Get in touch with your story.

              And finally, if you haven’t found your profitable niche or purpose yet then don’t worry. With time, patience and a helping hand there’s no reason why you can’t achieve success with your coaching business. Be sure to check out our free training and resources to help find your way.

               

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              Brett Worth

              TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
              Brett loves nothing more than getting things done. A creative at heart, he can usually be found working behind the scenes bringing ideas to life. He uses his varied skillset – which includes everything from photography to coding – to help good people do more good.

              45 Comments

              1. Des

                Great read! I totally forgot that choosing a specific niche can really be where profit lies. I run a coaching business, but now I’m thinking of going into the relational aspects of it since most of my graduate and undergraduate studies focused around couples and family counseling.

                This is a good reminder that career-wise its good to be niched.

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Des! Thanks for the kind words, we create this content to help people like you so it’s great to know that you found it to be useful. I’ve just taken a quick look at your website and love what you do, the world needs more people who want to do work that matters. Here a 3 quick things I noticed which might help you on your mission: 1) Include your name and a photo of yourself on your About page. It’s a good idea to build rapport and introduce yourself to your visitors and your About page is ideal for doing this. 2) Consider adding prices to your website instead of your ‘Instant Quote’ form, not only will it make it easier for people to know if they can work with you, but it will help to ensure you’re getting enquiries from people who value your services. 3) Create a strong call-to-action. You can put this at the bottom of each page or as a featured button in your menu (or both!), this will help your visitors take the next step without wondering what to do next. I hope you find these tips useful, if you’d like some more recommended reading feel free to get in touch via email or browse our blog. Have a great day!

                  Reply
              2. Brett Worth

                Hi Elizabeth!

                You’re right about Spiritual Life Coaching, it’s been on our radar for a while now. Some of our clients are seeing great success with their Spiritual Coaching businesses and we’ll be adding more examples of our work with them to our Portfolio soon.

                Perhaps I was a bit mean limiting this list to only 7 niches – but what can I say? I just really like the number 7. 🙂

                I should write a follow up to this post in the near future so that I can share more profitable coaching niches, would you mind if I considered adding you as an example for Spiritual Life Coaching?

                Have a great day!

                Reply
              3. Coach Marlana

                This is good and breaks things down. I still find my niche not jumping out at me. I have clients who want clarity and confidence but externally are seeking different outcomes. I want to dial down on one to be clear to others what I offer.

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Thanks Marlana! It’s not easy finding a niche, especially when you already have a steady flow of clients with diverse needs. One ways you might go about this would be to see what all of your clients have in common and what brought them to you, then think about which clients you enjoy working with the most and why. Somewhere in there is your sweet spot; the meeting point of doing what you love and what your clients need. If you need any help with this feel free to get in touch, our free Clarity Call can be a real eye-opener for coaches who are trying to find their niche. Good luck on your journey!

                  Reply
              4. DK

                Is personal development coaching profitable as well ?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Definitely, although personal development is such a broad subject it would be worth drilling down and finding the niches with it. The response to this article has been great and there’s been some really interesting conversations around it. I think our team will be looking for more profitable coaching niches to share soon and personal development will be a good place to start.

                  Reply
                  • Kim

                    Thanks for insight !!! I’m in the process of starting a life coach business but I’m doing it for the love of people not just profit . I love the information you have given us . I have so many ideas running through my mind LOL !!! So far I’m considering stating myself as a Goal Attainment/Self care life coach for Women and Young Adults or is that too much? Ur input is great appreciated

                    Reply
                    • Brett Worth

                      Hi Kim! Congratulations on starting your life coaching business. We believe that coaching is one of the best choices when it comes to making a difference, but it really does help to make a profit too. It’s not all about the money but many people may not realise that by making a profit you can do more things to help more people. When it comes to starting out I’d focus on one very specific client and becoming known as the most helpful person for those clients. While you could serve women and young adults you may be achieve better results for your business if you choose one. Your branding and messaging will be more effective if they speak to someone specific, for example; professional women in their early 30s who want to achieve a career goal. Good luck on your journey!

                      Reply
              5. Leelo Bush PhD

                I have seen the most profitable coaching niches are those that make the greatest impact in the lives of others. The coaches who work in the areas of restoring joy after grief and relieving stress are universally needed and hired.

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  You are absolutely right! Coaches have the power to make such a huge difference and the ones that do are always going to be in demand.

                  Reply
              6. grace

                HI! I am not even a life coach yet, but I think it’s there in my path. So thank you so much for explaining on the different niches. I personally love mindset and accountability coaching. But wouldn’t that be closely related to the whole life coaching umbrella itself? What advice would you have about this niche more?

                Thank you so much!!!

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Grace! In my opinion all of these things are under the life coach umbrella. What I’ve found though is that calling yourself a ‘life coach’ isn’t really that helpful for potential clients. It’s the same as calling yourself a ‘photographer’, for example: “I’m a photographer!”, “Awesome, so can you photograph my wedding?”, “Well actually, no, I’m a wildlife photographer”… The trick is to help potential clients understand right away how you can help them and for me that means niching down to a level that most people will understand. It doesn’t take much, but just that extra clarification about what kind of life coach you are makes the world of difference. In fact, I’d even suggest going deeper with the niching! We have clients who instead of calling themselves a life coach, or even a mindset coach, call themselves things like ‘perfectionist coach’ and ‘the self care coach’.

                  Looking forward to seeing you step into coaching. Keep in touch!

                  Reply
              7. Eden

                Hi great read thanks. What about a money management coach to help people save and manage money. Is that a niche?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Eden. I think money management is a good one, especially considering what’s currently going on in the world. There’s likely to be an increase in anxiety about finances over the coming months and having someone to talk to would be helpful. If you haven’t considered it yet then be sure to map out your customer avatars, money management will vary greatly depending on who your ideal client is. Think about how you’d approach coaching a parent who wants their teenage son to learn about managing his savings vs. a women in her 50’s who is thinking about her retirement. Dig deep and you’ll find the gold. Thanks for your comment and be sure to reach out if you need anything.

                  Reply
              8. Peterson Herard

                Hi Brett,

                I am thinking about getting in the mindset niche wanting to help people who people have experienced trauma/grief. But I dont know if people would be receptive of that. what re your thoughts?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Peterson, I think that any service that can help ease someone else’s suffering is worthwhile so I think your skills would be put to good use. The only thing that I’d suggest – and you may have seen me say this in other comments – is try to narrow your niche down and be selective about your clients. How does trauma and grief differ for men and women, for young and old, for the loss of a partner vs a parent? If you can figure out exactly who you want to work with and how your skills can help them specifically your messaging and branding will be much stronger. A clearer message will help you position yourself as the right person for the these people and I believe your work will be more impactful. Thanks for your question and have an awesome day!

                  Reply
                  • ANTHONY G. NDERITU

                    Thanks Brett. I found the article very clear and useful. I love the very targeted differentiation, including gender consideration. Men and women definitely have unique post-trauma reactions and need a coach who not only empathizes but fully understands their needs.

                    Reply
              9. Maria

                Brett,

                What would say you in the best niche for someone wanting to get in the mindset space?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Maria, I’d say that would also depend on your own interests and who you’d like to help. We call the intersection where these two things meet the ‘sweet spot’, and once you’re in it you’ll be on your way towards your vision. It’s all about marrying your unique approach and skills with the people who will benefit most and who you enjoy working with. Start with your ideal client; who are they, how old are they, what are their interests and what problems do they have? Your niche and business will be different depending on who your ideal client is – you won’t work with a 50 year old business executive in the same way you would with a 18 year old up-and-coming athlete. Their mindset and coaching needs will be quite different.

                  If you haven’t already, take a look at our Ultimate Guide To Upgrading Your Coaching Website, in section 1 there’s a free client persona resource that will help. And if you want to carry on the conversation – and get help from a community of other coaches – check out our Facebook group, we’ll be happy to help: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thegoodalliance/

                  Have a great week!

                  Reply
              10. Julie Bockarie

                Hi Brett:

                I am interested in coaching parents of teens so that they can have better relationship with their teens, but I am not sure what to call my niche. Can you please advise.

                Thanks a lot.

                Julie

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Julie! This is a great problem to have, but I think it might not be a problem at all. It sounds like you are already over the point where you need to find a niche. If you are trying to serve everyone then niches are a great way to help you to narrow down your options, but you already know who you are interested in helping so you don’t need to find a niche to fit in to. I think the process usually looks something like this:

                  Step 1 is starting a business and trying to work with everyone.
                  Step 2 is working out that choosing a niche will get you better, higher-paying clients.
                  Step 3 is knowing who you want to help and how you want to help them.

                  The difficulty you might be facing is that because you don’t have a specific niche you don’t know how to label what you do, does that sound right? Choosing a niche would help but I think at this point you would benefit from branding your business. If done right your brand should do much of the explaining and selling for you. The difference between finding a niche and creating a brand is that with a brand you carve out your own area within the niche, so you go from a ‘relationship coach’ (of which there are many) to ‘Julie the transformative family coach’ (a bad example, but hopefully you understand what I’m saying?)

                  If you’d like to talk more about your next steps you can schedule a free call with our team here: https://thegoodalliance.org/clarity/

                  Have a great day!

                  Reply
              11. Allison Todd

                This is very helpful blog to find a life coach and every points are very useful & accurate. I agree with this. Thanks for this wonderful blog.

                Reply
              12. Neha

                Hi Brett
                I am confused about my niche as of now as I’m under training to become a coach. However I like the idea of a life purpose coach. What do you think about it

                Or what is most in demand nowadays .
                Kindly suggest

                Reply
              13. Neha

                Hi please tell me if inner peace and happiness coach is a good idea or I need to be more specific

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Neha, I think the niche is fine as long as you are choosing it based on who you want to serve. Who is your ideal client? Is it men, aged 20-30? If so do they want an inner peace coach? Niching is important but it’s only half of the picture, you’ve got to match it up with who you like to work with and who you can impact the most.

                  Have a think about your ideal client and see if it matches up.

                  Cheers!
                  Brett

                  Reply
              14. Kim

                Hi Brett,

                Thank you for the helpful article.
                I am considering being a coach for single women ( divorced and never been married). Do you suggest I pick only one – either singles or divorcees? My goal is to help them build confidence, improve their lives, and self-care. Any suggestions?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Kim, I think that’s a great group of people to support. I’m not sure you’d have to pick just one of them but it may help you create services or products if you do.
                  Do single people face different challenges than divorced people? If so then it may be better to narrow down your focus so you can serve one group fully. I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t serve both, but I think you’ll be far more effective if you were to pick one. That way you could hone your message and branding so it creates a really strong connection with your audience.

                  Take advantage of our free Clarity Call if you haven’t already, it could help you work out what your next best step is: https://thegoodalliance.org/apply/

                  Reply
              15. Brandy R

                Hi Brett!

                I have decided to start my journey of becoming a certified coach, and I only want to chose niches that reflect my personal life journey, because being able to personally relate to my future clients is very important to me. My issue is that I have 7-10 niches that I believe that I would be very helpful to others in, but is that too many? Or could I obtain a coach certification and list all of the niches on my site? Lastly, because I have multiple niches, could I obtain a certification in life coaching alone? Or will I need to obtain certifications for all of my niches? My niches are Spirituality, LGBT, Health, Confidence, Personal Empowerment, Job Transition, and Teens/Young Adult Grief.

                Great article by the way! So very helpful! 🙂

                Kind regards

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Brandy! Congratulations on starting your coaching journey. It’s been a while since you commented so hopefully you are well on your way now despite all of the craziness going on around the world right now.

                  I think 7-10 niches is far too many and would be nearly impossible to create effective messaging for. The only coaches who do this well are ones that are extremely well established and this only works because they are well-known. So where someone like Marie Forleo can work across lots of different niches, most coaches will want to focus their efforts.

                  Think about who you want to help, why you want to help them and what solutions you can offer. Working with a client who is a 50 year old father of 3 struggling with depression will be wildly different than working with a 20 year old who is confused about her sexuality. The methods, solutions and even your messaging will be different for each case. A life coaching certificate may open doors to working across many different niches but I think to be effective you’ll need to dig deep and find out who you enjoy working with.

                  Once you’ve narrowed it down everything will be much easier. You’ll be able to tell people what you do in seconds, not minutes and your website content will speak directly to your ideal client.

                  I can’t wait to see where your journey takes you. Thanks for getting in touch.

                  Reply
              16. Anu

                Hi Brett! I am just starting my coaching biz, and have chosen to be a women empowerment coach. My issue is, what niche is WE I should pursue.Any thoughts?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Anu, I wouldn’t worry too much about the niche. Knowing that you want to be a women empowerment coach is already a huge help. You know you want to work with women, so my next question would be what age range? Then consider what problems they have and how you can solve them. What is stopping your ideal client from being empowered and in what area of their life is it? Are they being passed over for a promotion? Are they in a bad relationship? Do they feel too old to achieve their aspirations? Figure out exactly who your client is and then create a service that will help them. You’ll then be well on your way to a business that makes a profit and an impact.

                  If you need help getting started feel free to apply for a free Clarity Call: https://thegoodalliance.org/apply

                  Reply
              17. Tristan

                Hey. My name ist Tristan (24) and I really appreciate your words. I am from Europa and I’m thinking about going deeper with my personal developmemt business, niching down to self consciousness. What do you think about it? Maybe even more and just work with women between 30-50? Help them to get Back into their selfconsiousness?
                Best wishes and thanks for you work

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hey Tristan, thanks for your comment! Niching down is always a good idea to help get established and the deeper you go the better chance you have at connecting with your ideal client. Think about who you want to work with, how you can solve their problems and then go all in on serving them.

                  Reply
              18. Debby Thomas

                Love this article ! I am a wellness coach but I’m very interested in helping people with there “lifestyle”
                Even as it pertains to fashion , events, etc ! Not sure how to define that !?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Debby. I love that you want to combine (what sounds like) your passions together to help people. Sometimes your niche label can only do so much and you’ve got to let your branding take over and do the rest. So your niche could be a ‘wellness coach’ but your branding could help you fuse everything together: you’re the wellness coach who makes find a deeper connection to themselves through the clothes they wear… that sort of thing. We love Mel Noakes as an example of this, sure we might class her as a health coach in our article, but she’s branded as the ‘self-care coach’. Her branding tells you more about her than her niche and it’s the next step to becoming known as someone who has a solution.

                  If you’d like some help defining your vision feel free to apply for a free Clarity Call: https://thegoodalliance.org/apply Thanks for your comment.

                  Reply
              19. Manny

                You’re right when you say that no two are alike! Men’s empowerment coaching is a niche that I’m striving towards – to give men tools to access healthy masculinity and become a whole, integrated being so that they can move from self conscious suffering to self aware confidence in their authentic expression of self.

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Thanks Manny! It’s great to see that you are dedicating yourself to men’s empowerment coaching. From what I’ve seen, coaching is dominated by women (although this may not really be the case – our clients are mostly female) and it’s awesome to see men stepping up to help other men. You’ve probably got your work cut out for you but I believe we are moving towards a time where men are more open about being supported and that can only be a good thing. I wish you all the best with your business and if you ever feel like you are hitting a wall or don’t know what to do next feel free to get in touch.

                  Reply
              20. Judy

                I appreciate your article and the breakdown, very well written!
                My niche is with Profit, Purpose, and Accountability for Small Business’ and Clarity on financials. Would you suggest my advertising in the Small Business niche?

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Judy, thanks for your question. From what you’ve said it sounds like you’d fit into the small business coaching niche – but if you wanted to you could dig down deeper and define it further. What kind of small businesses? Ones that have been operating for less than 6 months, 12 months, 24 months? Ones with a turnover of less than 10k? The deeper you go the stronger the connection can be with your ideal client. The more specific you are the better quality clients you should find.

                  Once you define your ideal client you can then further develop your vision statement and messaging. It goes from ‘Profit, Purpose, and Accountability for Small Business’ and Clarity on financials‘ to ‘I help small online business owners with a turnover of less than 15k grow their profit, find their purpose and stay accountable.‘ You could dial it in further too, what kind of small businesses? Do your methods work the same for a mechanics garage and a local bakery? Who do you like working with and who can you impact the most?

                  I tried checking out your website but couldn’t get it to work so hopefully this means your in the process of setting it up. Looking forward to seeing it once you’re finished. If you have any questions feel free to get in touch (or at least checkout our free ultimate guide to upgrading your coaching website which should offer some great tips for your website).

                  Reply
              21. Aries

                Thank you for your sharing. I am passionate about helping people to find their core values as I have personally seen the power of transformation in myself (to recover / to get on with life with my bereavement) and the the clients I have coached, but my coach told me this is too idealistic and people won’t pay for my services. It is advisable to go for popular niches. I am trained in performance coaching, NLP so I can do communication, relationship (is also a factor of core values), self confidence, even career coaching, question. What is your view especially from the look of my website ? Is it too wide and non-focus.

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hi Aries, I’m not sure I agree with your coach about helping people deal with recovery but perhaps it is the way you are framing it. What does it mean to help someone find their core values? Is it to help people reconnect with themselves after a bereavement or just generally for anyone who feels lost? Bereavement coaching is definitely worthwhile is that is what interests you.

                  Think about who you like working with, who has been your best client? Then consider why you enjoyed working with them. Is this something you’d like to do more of? Tailor your services and messaging around this client and you should attract more people like them. Don’t be afraid to get specific: how old are they, what do they do, where do they live? Build a clear picture of who your ideal client is and what problems they are facing. This way, you can position yourself as the coach with the perfect solution for them.

                  Your website is crucial for this but can only be effective if you are clear on what you offer and who you are offering it to. Then it’s a matter of making sure your website accurately represents your services and champions you as someone who can solve your clients problems. After a quick look around your website I can see potential but there are several things which could be improved and would greatly impact how your clients perceive you and your business.

                  Start by thinking about how you would introduce yourself in 10 seconds: “Hi, I’m Aries and I help [your ideal client, e.g. women in their 30’s and 40’s] by [the outcome of working with you, e.g. helping them rediscover their core values so that they can start living a richer life after loss.]

                  If you need help getting clear on your vision feel free to hit the button in the menu and apply for a free Clarity Call: https://thegoodalliance.org/apply

                  Reply
              22. Claryn Nicholas

                Hi Brett
                I’ve called myself a Career and Relationship Coach for women in STEM. I help them to continue advancing in their career without burnout out or sacrificing their relationships – do you think it’s OK to call myself 2 things here? if not, what would you suggest it could be please? Thank you.

                Reply
                • Brett Worth

                  Hey Claryn! I think it’s fine to call yourself two things within the same field if you are experiencing success with both of them. If you’re finding that things are perhaps moving along a little slower than you’d like, or seem to have stopped altogether, then it could be both sets of clients are getting confused and your messaging could be refined. What do you know about your ideal client? Are clients who want career coaching the same age as those that want relationship coaching? If they are different then your messaging will be stretched between trying to serve them both.

                  Reply
              23. Deon Rush

                Hello,

                Beneficial information, profitable life coaching is great. Thank you for share this blog.

                Reply

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